Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

We have all seen those commercials portraying the smiling family with the perfect, white teeth and haircuts eating out and having the time of their lives at the local chain restaurant with the picture-perfect food and lively atmosphere.

When we eat at these places, however, it’s sometime about as fun as watching the local gas station change tires on a Friday night, or watching a Pauley Shore television marathon.

Lack of value for the mediocre food, an atmosphere without unique character and an overall generic, soulless feel have often left us seeking out “real New England” restaurants — the kind that make you feel good all over about living in this region while serving the type of food that taps into our traditional side. No hand-rubbed this, garlic-infused that, and no scripted waitstaff sitting down right next to you and saying,”Hi, my name is Elmo and I’m your waiter for the evening. Now, I really don’t like you but my corporate training program makes me have to sit next to you. Since I can’t find another job, I’ll just take your order, and hopefully never see you again after this meal. Now, let me tell you what I have on the menu (as if they were the owners and created the food themselves!)”

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Whew! Let’s go back to a simpler time by exploring classic New England restaurants with fresh regional food, not-so-fresh waitstaff, and a refreshing atmosphere that would have pleased everyone from George Washington to your nephew with the Palm Pilot surgically attached to his hand:

The 1761 Old Mill, Route 2A, Westminster, Mass. (north central Massachusetts), Phone (978) 874-5941 — This former sawmill, built in 1761, is, in itself, a major New England attraction with its beautiful pond with ducks and waterfall, walkable covered bridge, extended old wooden front porch and charming dining rooms that make you say, “Yes, I am now in New England.” With a roaring fireplace (except in the summer), old post-and-beam design and wooden floors in the lobby and dining rooms, and a creaky, stone-floor gift shop in the basement, the Old Mill is your quintessential New England restaurant. Now none of that would mean anything if the food wasn’t any good, but the food is good, plentiful and an excellent overall value. Some standouts: the sweet, sticky pecan rolls, chicken pot pie, roast duck, and the “Old Mill Sizzler” — a thick cut of prime rib grilled with peppers, onions and mushrooms on a hot sizzle platter, with teriyaki sauce. For dessert, save room for the amazing homemade apple crisp! Equally impressive is the Sunday morning buffet with its homemade corn fritters and pecan rolls, carved ham and roast beef, breakfast specials, and a wonderful variety of homemade desserts.

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

The Salem Cross Inn, Route 9, West Brookfield, Mass. (central Massachusetts), Phone (508) 867-2345 — This is the Colonial dining version of the “Sound of Music,” situated on 600 acres of rolling hills, fields, meadows and woodlands in a truly beautiful, unspoiled and underrated region of Massachusetts called the Quaboag Hills. In business since 1961 and with the main house built in the early 1700s, the Salem Cross Inn was named for the witch-mark found on the front door-latch of the Inn. You won’t find any witch-like service or green brews in a vat, however, just great New England fare like prime rib (cooked in a restored 1699 beehive oven), Yankee pot roast, chicken pot pie, Atlantic salmon, apple raspberry roasted duck, Indian pudding, butternut squash, pumpkins muffins, homemade breads, clam chowder and the amazing pecan pie and apple pie. In addition to the delicious fare, The Salem Cross Inn almost seems like a community within itself with multi-course fireside feasts, apple pie contests, herb sampling, fireplace pit roasts, a Murder Mystery Dinner Theater, and hayrides and sleigh rides at various times of the season. The atmosphere is also marvelous within its three charming floors: the Chestnut Room features a huge fieldstone fireplace and 42-long chestnut ceiling beams; the old hay barn boasts splendid views of the woods and meadows; and smaller rooms filled with antiquarian books, maps, documents and other curios create a New England scene that will remain with you long after the visit to this memorable dining spot.

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Elmo Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Longfellow’s Wayside Inn, 72 Wayside Inn Rd., Sudbury, Mass. (west suburban Boston), Phone (978) 443-1776, Toll-free: 1-800-339-1776 — What could have been a tourist trap given its storied history is, thankfully, one of the best choices for traditional dining in Massachusetts, or New England, for that matter. Rustic rooms, cozy firelight and expert, warm service combine with fresh and delicious homemade breads, clam chowder, Boston schrod, lobster pie, Yankee Pot Roast, and deep-dish apple pie to make for one of the ultimate “New England” traditional dining experiences. Known best as the gathering place in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s 1862 “Tales of a Wayside Inn,” the Wayside Inn has been in business since 1716 (it’s also a quaint inn for lodging) and keeps the old look and tradition intact — the rustic “Old Bar Room,” for example, looks like a Colonial version of “Cheers!”

By Eric Hurwitz
Article Source: ezinearticles.com